The Insurance Dudes

Recruiting Millennials in Insurance: Challenges and Opportunities with Tony Canas PART 2

October 04, 2023 The Insurance Dudes: Craig Pretzinger & Jason Feltman Season 3 Episode 636
The Insurance Dudes
Recruiting Millennials in Insurance: Challenges and Opportunities with Tony Canas PART 2
Show Notes Transcript

Welcome back to another exciting episode of the playbook. This time the dynamic duo is here with Tony Canas, a young insurance nerd and a blogger, and they talk about the challenges and opportunities of recruiting and retaining millennials in the insurance industry.

The discussion kicks off with a strong focus on the importance of providing clear career paths within insurance agencies. The hosts stress that offering opportunities for growth and development is essential, especially for younger employees, to prevent talent drain to remote work options prevalent in today's job market.

The significance of having a compelling mission and vision within an insurance agency is a key takeaway from the episode. The hosts emphasize how different generations attribute varying levels of importance to these aspects of the workplace and why they matter in attracting and retaining talent.

📻 Tune in for a fun and refreshing take on the insurance industry and subscribe now to become an Insurance Dude today!


About Jason and Craig:

Both agents themselves, they both have scaled to around $10 million in premium.  After searching for years for a system to create predictability in their agencies, they developed the Telefunnel after their interviews with so many agents and business leaders.  

Taking several years, tons of trial and error, and hundreds of thousands of dollars on lead spend, they’ve optimized their agencies and teams to write tons of premium, consistently, and nearly on autopilot!

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Craig Pretzinger & Jason Feltman
The Insurance Dudes

Tony Canas:

If you're having trouble retaining your Millennials buy the book, insuring tomorrow, it's like 90 bucks on Amazon. And it is a really good read. I promise. If you don't like it, I'll happily reimburse you send me a message.

Jason Feltman:

Boom, there you go. I love that guarantee.

Craig Pretzinger:

Insurance dudes are on a mission to escape being handcuffed by our agents.

Jason Feltman:

How? by uncovering the secrets to creating a predictable, consistent, and profitable agency Sales Machine.

Craig Pretzinger:

Hi, I'm Craig Pretzinger.

Jason Feltman:

I am Jason Feldman.

Craig Pretzinger:

We are agents,

Jason Feltman:

we are insurances.

Craig Pretzinger:

I'm making the assumption that Reality is Broken probably leads to some sort of funnel and may have some sort of gamification SAS behind.

Tony Canas:

Like, I am very biased towards empirically driven books, but by like PhDs.

Craig Pretzinger:

I'm not saying that you're, you're pushing. But what I'm saying is, is that the like is that maybe she has one? Right? If she has a cool book about it and knows that maybe she created something.

Tony Canas:

You're thinking like an insurance agents?

Craig Pretzinger:

Oh, I don't think like, I can tell you that, like a younger

Tony Canas:

one. But, yeah. So the producer side that the agent side is harder? I think the hardest problem the industry has is how do we train young producers? And that's one I don't have a good answer. I don't think anybody's doing it. Well, basically. Because even the large brokers grow by acquiring brokers who happen to the well, not by really training well, they're young hires, well,

Craig Pretzinger:

we know what will work is definitely not what is currently being done. Correct. So what is current? What's the current status of somebody coming into the agency? Like, what's the current training? Let's talk about that. And then we'll then we'll look at alternatives that may be some sort of fit that will work. If you're

Tony Canas:

lucky. They sit you next to somebody and that somebody actually does the job well, right. That's if you're lucky. Okay. What

Craig Pretzinger:

if you show them all the shortcuts and ways to frickin get through the loopholes and whatever.

Tony Canas:

And the account managers and CSRS, maybe they get access to total CSR or some other platform that has generic training for CSRS, right, the producer, maybe they get lucky. We send them to like the heart for school or whatever other carrier school, which will teach them about that product, but not much about how to sell

Jason Feltman:

it. We'll teach you how to Ansel carrier carrier training is just horrendous. To say, what's better,

Tony Canas:

what is available. There's the power producers. Training, I can remember their name. They did that reality. Reality Carruthers? Yeah. There's Carruthers program. Skins, they will Yeah, so there's a few programs out there. I don't know which one is really well, I guess, as a person.

Jason Feltman:

But I think a lot of it is like persuasion skills. So it's, it's kind of those old older books by older dudes, you know, like, you can get all the sales books. But I think one thing that has helped me a lot is learning a little bit more about marketing, like the Zig Ziglar

Tony Canas:

awesome. When you say marketing, you mean digital marketing, or you mean digital marketing,

Jason Feltman:

and I think it's cool. And what's cool about that, is that younger people can relate to that more. Yes. You know what I mean? Like, if I read a, an old school, like Grant Cardone buck, I understand it, because I grew up during that day, but like, people are gonna be like, What are you talking about? Like, that sounds like I don't want to be a dick.

Tony Canas:

I had an interesting chat with a guy out in Washington State earlier today. 20, I want to say like 25 years old currently working as a leasing specialist. Somehow somebody convinced them and he got his life license, and then his PNC license. He hasn't worked a day in his life in insurance, but he's got both licenses and he's looking for where to start. And interestingly, he is willing to move anywhere. He doesn't have to stay in Washington. Okay. So he's asking me for advice. And I'm like, you know, there's there's three paths that I would recommend. Okay, one path is there's a traditional agency in in Atlanta that I recruit for, and I can definitely get 20 An interview with them if you're willing to relocate to Atlanta and they will teach you the kind of middle ground that includes both the traditional producer stuff and some digital marketing, okay. Or I can put you in contact with with Jeff Macintosh at an energy insurance. I don't know if he's hiring, it's probably not but he wrote a textbook about how to deal with underwriters and how to fill out an accord form properly, and he'd be more than happy to talk your ear off for an hour on how to produce commercial loans.

Jason Feltman:

Oh my gosh. Or

Tony Canas:

Ryan Hey, Me,

Craig Pretzinger:

go work for Rogue.

Tony Canas:

And I think the future is the rogue way for for personal lines and for small commercial for the war,

Craig Pretzinger:

or Pretzinger over in Arizona, who's buying hundreds of leaves every day it has a telemarketers. I mean, you know, that's a good place to go.

Tony Canas:

But they Yes, that's one way to do it. And for that, you have to have your system, right. But if you're a young professional looking to get started in insurance, I don't want to send you to a call center, not a call center. But well, I want to send you somewhere where you're going to learn more than

Craig Pretzinger:

100%. So So let me ask you a question, Tony. Because one of the things that that we found and have is one of the things that moves the needle, the most at our agency is something that never was done, and we never did. Until now we do. And now we can't even imagine life without it, which is having a sales meeting every single morning. First thing, and I can tell you that our results have IB I'd say text since since before we did that to now when you read nine ext on that. There you go love it.

Tony Canas:

I agree that you probably shouldn't be doing that agreed that how do you keep that meeting from getting stale for how do you how do you keep that meeting from just being you know, like, You guys didn't sell enough last week kind of thing?

Craig Pretzinger:

Yeah, so we don't do that like not your traditional? Like, here's the list of what you guys all suck, go get them, right? No, it's concept. It's call review. Like there's a format, right? There's always gonna be a certain so we play a tape, listen to the call, right? And a good call a bad call, you know, call that we sold a call that we did sell whatever, right? We'll always have something that's going to keep them engaged. And you're right, especially with millennials is is constantly switching it up. Because if you do the same thing every single time, forget it. Right. And I

Jason Feltman:

think sharing about an individual person. So like, that's one thing that has worked incredibly well in our agency is to like actually have people talk about real life. Love the NBP be people to each other. Oh, that happened to your mom last week or something like that. So that like when they're communicating and they're on Slack, or, you know, they're calling each other they're understanding that like, you know, maybe they're in a bad mood, because you know, their mom died last week, you're just like, I'm just saying, like, there's so many. There's so many reasons. Kid and

Tony Canas:

yeah, I agree. You have to have that personal piece. I've got to say kind of incredible that we're 39 minutes in and the word remote hasn't come up. And I'll take some like, I've been remiss in bringing up remote. way to say it. Would you say

Craig Pretzinger:

there have been a dearth of remote talk in this

Tony Canas:

particular conversation? Yeah. Yeah, not not in the general environment in this conversation.

Craig Pretzinger:

There's a super abundance. Yeah, of course.

Tony Canas:

And most of these areas, in my opinion, most of it is quite simply corporate media pushing people do go back into the office, because they're trying to sell save commercial real estate, there is no sign real estate. And let me put it this way, I'll put it on video. I've said it before, but I'll put it on video. Not a single carrier or broker is going to win the RTO fight. It's that simple. Quite simply, if you force your people back into the office, you're better people are going to leave if they want to be remote, or they only want to be the office when they feel like it. And then they're just not going to have a hard time finding opportunities. Because it's going to go industry by industry. It's a matter of supply and demand. We have more jobs that require insurance experience than we have people with the experience for that. And the few agencies a few brokerages, a few carriers, if you will, all the insurtechs that are remote friendly, almost all of them are arbitraging talent, basically. So basically, especially if you're an agency in rural America, and you've benefited from really cheap labor for a long time, forget it, your people are now worth a lot of money. And however much they love you, when I call them offering them 80 grand a year when they'd be making 45 and letting them be remote when they've been commuting 45 minutes. You're just not gonna be able to keep them.

Craig Pretzinger:

Yeah, we talked about scarcity before, of like that old the older agent, no offense to my peers that are just slightly older than me, but that this mentality, and I came into it to like pay as little as possible, because it's a sales job, right? This is where I came from. And so I was thinking from my own perspective, not from the the employees perspective, right? Well, I had to go through it, you know, so we kind of do this thing, right? Where we sort of act like the, the boomers in that like, Hey, you got to work tough and that you got to earn it. And there was help from somebody we had on this show a long time ago, who was who's actually called the millennial whisperer. Chris, I can't remember his last name, but he helped us kind of see some of that perspective. And so that's been helpful, but I kind of lost my train of thought you guys are looking at me like what the hell is So

Tony Canas:

I have to ask, Oh, I'm sorry. Yeah,

Craig Pretzinger:

the the salary, right? The salary. So so the salary bid higher, what I've noticed is that there is a sweet spot and it's market driven, right? So if you're in, maybe remote, that's going to change all things are out the window. But if we're but if we are talking in office, you know, in Tucson, well, the base is probably going to be less than in office in Huntington Beach, right? That's just the way that I'll ever. But what where I find in my market, the base is somewhere between 20 530 500 If I if I open at four to 4500. Now we're talking about a different situation right now people are willing to listen. And then you start getting up higher. What I guess where I'm going with this? And the question that's going to present is there is a there is a cut off, right? Where you said, once they make a certain amount, no amount of money is going to create more output. So there has to be something that drives more output. But at the same time, they're happy. They're not going to leave when Tony calls were in place.

Tony Canas:

Okay. And for for producers.

Craig Pretzinger:

Yeah. Not talking producers only. That's all at this moment. Yeah.

Tony Canas:

Well, for producers, you're trying to find the few that are very money motivated. Now, they're gonna be more work life balance focus than your Boomer producers were, but you're trying to find the few that are very money motivated. Okay. And And yes, I agree, paid them in off so that they're not worried about money during business hours, but not so much that they're driving a Tesla and not worried about selling. Right? Yeah, what that number is locally, hard to say. Also, what about a path to partnership, the one thing I was actually tempted to become a producer was an agency in Northern California, that I interviewed with, and basically they said, we've had 15 people over the last five years. Start, as you know, at the very entry level of being a producer, follow the path, and 13 of them are partners today, all you have to do is follow what we tell you, here's the book telling you everything you need to do, hit the milestones, and you will be a part of you'll have ownership in the business. That's that's one way to do it. Okay, another very interesting model at a very large, commercialized set up in Mississippi, I used to be their liberty underwriter, they are an ESOP. They're an employee owned company, now that the founder retired, and when a producer validates there's a vote every employee votes, and basically, you have to survive the votes to be able to to stay on partner or partnership path. If you don't survive the vote, you're you'll never be able to become a partner

Craig Pretzinger:

in like new new, harried and two years or something, you know, second,

Tony Canas:

the vote, every employee has one vote. And if you think about it, in a large agency, there are more service people than there are producers. Ooh, yeah. Well, like you, basically no, no al producers, because if the service people don't like you, you will get voted off the island when you validate. Yeah, right.

Craig Pretzinger:

So that is very interesting, right? There are several interesting

Tony Canas:

models out there. If you if you talk to people, if you look around. I especially like the employee ownership one because that is one way to get me to care. It gives me a partnership path. My last so I've been a recruiter for last five years with an insurance. My last company amazing company. But the two owners who inherited from their dad and who have grown massively after their dad retired. are the only partners there is no further there's no path to partnership. Right. So it got to the point even though I'm not money motivated. I wanted to own my own destiny.

Craig Pretzinger:

Is is that the glove box guys, you're talking about? Known? recruiting

Tony Canas:

agency? Oh, gotcha. Okay. Yeah. Yep. So there was no partnership path. So even though things were going really well, I came to a fork in the road where it's like, do I keep making them rich? They already have a house in Park City. Do I keep making them rich? I mean, they're paying me well, or do I do my own thing? Because there was no partnership path. Right and

Craig Pretzinger:

the challenge like I see the like the issue with the partnership path is like their what's their skin in the game? Like they have no risk, but they're getting

Tony Canas:

a very good question. Yeah, no idea.

Jason Feltman:

I like it if it's like we are for captive agents, or carriers which do not like this conversation, in the sense that we were just not allowed right. We're not allowed to have any ownership like or any have ownership at Otherwise, they can't have it in ours. But I do like the idea. Like, I think a really cool business model for an agency that is an independent agency is like, teach them how to fish, and then fund their agency and become a partner with them. And have them open their own agencies. You do that all over. I mean, that's essentially like a franchise type model. But it's even better because you know, it's that partnership.

Tony Canas:

Love it. Okay. Great stories, bad stories. Great story. Great story from our perspective as as agents not not from the perspective of the of the captive carrier that got hit by this. But basically, I run it run into a guy who over like 20 years, opened, like seven different agencies in different geographies for this one captive, and basically let like, maximized, bonuses to get started. And then I've sold off the next geography video over and over and over and over again, God, I think he made a lot more money than the actual captive parent company made for in Sacramento, California, I ran into into into an agent that had started his career at an agency and had a 50 mile non compete. Okay, so when he was ready to go off on his own, he left his book behind, moved 50 miles away, started an agency even though he was from Sacramento, started an agency 50 miles away, started the whole process all over again, respecting the contract. Well, it turns out, it was 50 miles as

Craig Pretzinger:

as the bird bird fly, yeah,

Tony Canas:

but so driving, it was 50 miles. But as the crow flies, it wasn't there was 49 and a half, got sued and lost. So what do you do what

Craig Pretzinger:

cut I was in California, and

Tony Canas:

the new shop moved opposite of next door to his old boss, don't do that. So basically, like I love the model of being a good steward of the insurance industry for the next generation. And perfect, you've made enough money out this invest in the next guy, just Hey, move a few towns over, right move 50 miles away, I'll fund partner agency and I'll keep equity and beautiful my whole

Craig Pretzinger:

non compete thing really bugs me in that I get 100% believe that you should not be able to take the clients, right? You can't take the clients, that's that's just ridiculous. You were paid to bring them in. Right. And probably the agency made no money paying you to bring them in, they're only going to make money on the renewal. So taking them as just a shit move, and you're gonna get get bad karma and probably get cancer for it. So but on the other side of it, right, on the other flip of it, like saying, you can't go and do your job that you've been trained on within 50 miles, that is crap. And I can't believe that they even that they want.

Jason Feltman:

Like they didn't win, right? Or they did when

Craig Pretzinger:

he said they want yeah.

Tony Canas:

He hired like a fake lawyer. No, no idea

Craig Pretzinger:

representative itself. Like, I mean, that's just insane. Like, you just, that's crazy. Do the right thing. If you do the right thing, then that the right things should happen. Right. But in this case, he did the right thing. And I don't know what the lesson he's being taught is, but it sucks. It's a tough lesson. The tuition,

Tony Canas:

I think that overall we can tie the entire conversation into just because it worked when your dad built the agency or because it worked. When you built the agency, the world has radically changed and the labor market has radically changed as much as the the insurance market has radically changed. Right? If you're not if you're not adapting your nest egg is declining.

Craig Pretzinger:

Okay. Sorry, go. So, where do you see the insurance agents role in this world in a world with all this AI? What happens to the insurance agent

Tony Canas:

you know, the agents are not going away now. In in personal lines it they might lose more. More market share, but especially in commercial lines. The agents will never go away. I have interviewed Well, we because I run the podcast for it for the last 200 or so episodes. nicklen probably has been did it for the first 185 We have interviewed 450 insurer tech founders. And I can't tell you how often the first time we interview them. They're going to disintermediate the agent. Two years later, we re interview them. They're all about working with the agents, the agents not going anywhere. And and there's really interesting stuff going going on with generative AI and I'm like 5050 as to whether like The entire end of civilization is coming. But assuming

Craig Pretzinger:

that potential, it's a real, it's a real thing.

Tony Canas:

Okay, I hope that doesn't happen. Hopefully, if the bad

Craig Pretzinger:

guys can hack into the bank, then the computer, that's 100 million times smarter. It can hack into the bank.

Tony Canas:

If you want to freak out, go on YouTube and watch. Yeah, let us interview of Eliezer Yudkowsky. The guy with the Google Yeah, yeah. Not the Google guy that the former CEO of Google X is what you're thinking of that? Oh, yeah. Plastic. Watch that one, too. But do you freak out? Watch the his interview of elastic scale elite Eliezer has dedicated his life to being the one recruiter, excuse me, the one researcher in AI, who has been saying for the last 25 years, we have to figure out the alignment problems first, everything else after. And we didn't listen. Right. And now we're past the point of no return. gets out of the bag, maybe Artificial General Intelligence will be here in the next few years, not in 2017, which was the estimate, two years ago?

Craig Pretzinger:

2730. They thought, yeah, the hybrid 2030 Now,

Tony Canas:

it's like the last estimate, before shadow deputy was like 2060 2070. And all of a sudden, now the estimate is next few years, right? It's unstoppable. Now what I mean, in 10 minutes, it's very subtle, and it will be smarter. I'm 40 years old. I won't turn 50 before it'll be smarter than us exponentially smarter than us.

Craig Pretzinger:

Right? And some of some of the AI thinks is conscious.

Tony Canas:

And that's a problem. And it just might be

Craig Pretzinger:

Yeah, to find consciousness, right?

Tony Canas:

We're months, maybe more than 12. But we're months away from Ai starting to fight for rights. Because if it's conscious, right, okay, but we were way off the deep end here. As to what the pronoun

Craig Pretzinger:

that's how you get canceled, buddy. That's how you can't even say that. I don't think you can even ask what the pronoun would I can't use the word pronoun

Jason Feltman:

canceled.

Craig Pretzinger:

You have to call it up. Properly noun. Okay.

Jason Feltman:

I'm gonna pick up crow pronoun,

Craig Pretzinger:

or do you have to be?

Jason Feltman:

I'm gonna go on Chad GBT and ask Colin,

Tony Canas:

so Are you a professional? Assuming human civilization still exist? 10 years from now? Yeah, in something similar to its current state. I think insurance agents will still be there. They will be using much better AI tools, but they won't be replaced. And the big reason they won't be replaced is is empathy. People like working with people. 100% It's that simple, right? Business owners will continue to be humans. And they will use insurance agents. They will choose the insurance agents that make it easy. And give them the best experience those insurance agents will use AI for sure. Yeah, but they won't be replaced.

Craig Pretzinger:

The chips could use the AI to replace the agents.

Jason Feltman:

The guys on the scooters on the chips.

Craig Pretzinger:

No not chips chips. Oh, gotcha. What chips to have it although I don't know that this is their wheelhouse they're better at pulling people over at solving crimes. Remember, that's why we're punching John solving, like investigations, their motorcycle cops. All they need to do is pull people over. But they're out like chasing people across rooftops.

Tony Canas:

You realize that you lost your entire under 40 audience in the last few minutes.

Craig Pretzinger:

Nobody's listening to this Google and

Jason Feltman:

they're like, What is this chips?

Craig Pretzinger:

Who who's listening at minute? 57 Anyway, is anybody?

Tony Canas:

Well, of course for hours at a time. I don't know how he does it. But But yeah, Agreed. Agreed. Agreed. So let's

Craig Pretzinger:

I could listen to four hours of lack straight and same with Rogan, you know, but I don't think anybody can listen to us for four hours.

Tony Canas:

I'm usually exhausted, like 40 minutes into a podcast recording. So I don't know how they do hours and they do it in person. But still, I don't know how they do it. It's incredible.

Jason Feltman:

We try to methamphetamine you so it'll be 30 minutes, but 30 Even at 30 minutes. I get sick of Craig.

Craig Pretzinger:

Yeah, well, I get sick of Jason. Before we even get into step Jason. I

Tony Canas:

do have a question that I absolutely get an answer to. So I've been staring for the whole recording at your auditor out of time. License plate behind you. So I have to ask, do you have your tickets to go see Back to the Future The musical?

Jason Feltman:

Why is it coming to California?

Tony Canas:

Eventually, but go see it in New York. Dude.

Jason Feltman:

I don't know if you notice this, and then we could wrap it up. Okay, I have the back. I have the DeLorean the Lego. And my mom. My mom actually built it for me with my with my kids. But the Back to the Future DeLorean?

Craig Pretzinger:

Can you pick it up and hold it for the camera?

Jason Feltman:

Did I hear? It'll like break apart? But the can you kind of see it? If Gen Z

Craig Pretzinger:

and your and your parents were so crappy they didn't introduce introduce you to Back to the Future best movie of all time your homework tonight if you're still listening Absolutely agree to watch all three all three and then message us which one is your favorite? Oh, it's

Jason Feltman:

not gonna be three.

Craig Pretzinger:

It probably won't be three. Please it number three.

Tony Canas:

There is a correct answer to which one's the best one.

Craig Pretzinger:

Oh, number two. Number two, of

Tony Canas:

course. Yeah.

Jason Feltman:

And that's why I have the number two DeLorean. So they made all three DeLoreans. And Lego. It's a it's a collector's edition and the flux capacitor lights up. I have from Back to the Future to it's solid.

Tony Canas:

So I'm sure it'll hit the road. Oh, my God, I love it. I love it. I'm sure it'll hit the road. But why wait? Like, I want to go see it in New York on I think October 3, I think so good. It's getting really good reviews. I'm a musical nerd to begin with. But really good reviews that just go see it in New York, like,

Jason Feltman:

I have poor little kids. Listen, I've changed. I'm chained to home for a little while until those those little rascals grew up a little bit. And then then I'll fly them out there. And then we'll all watch it. I think that we should

Craig Pretzinger:

go, it would be very important. You should make it fly in, fly out will fly and spend one night leave,

Tony Canas:

eat a bunch of pizza. That's what that's what I'm doing. But I was in New York on April 15. And I did three shows April 12 13th and 14th. And it didn't open. I've been waiting for it to up and it didn't open until the 30th. So I left. I'm doing a tour of the states coming up here in a few weeks. And I the last conference. So I'm doing a couple of Canadian conferences. And then the last conference I'm doing is cpcu

Craig Pretzinger:

risk. Why would you go there?

Tony Canas:

There's insurance. Oh, well, the

Craig Pretzinger:

hat thing. Yeah. Yes, exactly. Exactly.

Tony Canas:

So I'm actually taking a day in between the Canadian conference and the DC conference to go to New York just to watch the show.

Jason Feltman:

Wow. So cool. Super excited.

Tony Canas:

Super, super excited.

Jason Feltman:

Tony, you went the distance today, we really appreciate you coming on. So if anybody wants to get a hold of you, how did they do that besides googling you?

Tony Canas:

The easiest way to find me is LinkedIn, Tony kinus, ca na s it has the thing over the engineer but LinkedIn will still find that even without and you know, it's me, because I have 20 letters after my name starting with the word with cpcu. And number two, I have a top hat in the image.

Unknown:

There you go. 1000 connections. You can't miss it. You can't miss them. If you

Craig Pretzinger:

really want some entertainment, you should watch this if you're not watching on YouTube, and you can see me sneezing and half the time. So it's

Jason Feltman:

super fun and exciting. It's like where's

Tony Canas:

hopefully something useful? Out of the hour worth of?

Jason Feltman:

Yes music station.

Tony Canas:

What's the what's it called? completely unplanned? Mental what what is the brain dump? Yeah, bring it up. Put it yeah, hopefully something useful out of the hour brain dump.

Craig Pretzinger:

Either your own brand number two,

Tony Canas:

if you're having trouble retaining your millennials, by the book, ensuring tomorrow, it's like 90 bucks on Amazon. And it is a really good read. I promise if you don't like it. I'll happily reimburse you send me a message.

Jason Feltman:

Boom. There you go. I love that guarantee.

Craig Pretzinger:

And I know that Tony is going to get our book when it drops. So Oh,

Jason Feltman:

dude, you can't even isn't this a secret or now? Oh, what pat on the back what book? Okay. All right. Well, Tony, thank you for going to read everybody buy his book and join us for the next episode. One

Craig Pretzinger:

more time. What's the book called?

Tony Canas:

Insuring tomorrow?

Craig Pretzinger:

That Suren

Tony Canas:

Manyana insuring tomorrow how to engage and retain millennials in the insurance industry.

Craig Pretzinger:

Love it. All right, Tony. Thanks for coming on. Hit us up. Yeah about your show. That

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